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Hepatitis Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Donate a Car

Right now there are 300 million individuals across the globe who have viral hepatitis and don’t even know it. Left undiagnosed and untreated, these people will continue to suffer and could lose their lives. July 28th has been designated as World Hepatitis Day, a day to raise awareness about hepatitis.

 

As a non-profit that has contributed to the research and treatment for those affected by hepatitis, we have teamed up with the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles to share ways to prevent this disease. When you donate a car to the Children’s Hospital, you create hope and help build a healthier future for someone in need.

 

Hepatitis is a liver disease that encompasses three major types: Hepatitis A, B and C. Each one of these types spreads in different ways.

 

Preventing Hepatitis A

A person can get Hepatitis A if they consume food or water that has the virus in it. They can also get infected if they have sexual relations or close physical contact with a person who has the virus. According to the Mayo Clinic, Hepatitis A is most frequently spread through the ingestion of small pieces of contaminated fecal matter.

 

  • The best way to prevent getting Hepatitis A is be get vaccinated.
  • Wash your hands often to prevent infection. Be most thorough in washing your hands after you have been in contact with portable toilets, public diaper changing tables and any other places where fecal matter might be present.
  • Be cautious when you are around people who are infected. Avoid ingesting food or drink handled by a person who’s been infected and avoid being physically intimate with someone who has Hepatitis A.
  • Be careful of what you eat and drink in developing world countries where Hepatitis A is common.
  • Call a doctor immediately if you experience these symptoms: fever, loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea, malaise, dark-colored urine, abdominal discomfort and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes).

 

There is no official treatment for Hepatitis A and recovery from the symptoms could take many weeks or months. Proper nutrition and keeping hydrated from diarrhea is the typical supportive treatment. The incubation time-frame for Hepatitis A is 14 to 28 days, so if you do contract it, be sure to notify anyone you have had close contact with in the last month.

 

Preventing Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B can be contracted if a person has contact with semen, blood or other bodily fluids of someone who is infected. Most commonly it is spread through sharing needles or sexual relations with someone who has the disease.

 

  • Prevention for Hepatitis B infection can be done with a vaccine. It has been recommended by the CDC that infants receive their first vaccine dose soon after birth with follow-up shots between 6 and 18 months.
  • Practice safe sexual relations by using new condoms for each encounter and using them correctly.
  • Do not inject yourself with illicit drugs. Promising to not share needles is not always effective since withdrawal symptoms can make a person more desperate.
  • Be cautious with tattooing and body piercing. Be sure that the equipment is sterilized properly and that the person performing the service is reputable.
  • Maintain a strong immune system by getting enough sleep, eating healthy foods, drinking purified water, practicing good hygiene and getting regular exercise.

 

Since Hepatitis B infects and inflames the liver, symptoms include jaundice, fatigue, fever, abdominal pain and dark-colored urine. There is no medical cure, but it can be prevented through the ways listed above.

 

Preventing Hepatitis C

There currently is no vaccine to prevent Hepatitis C. A person can be infected with this virus through blood transfusion. Symptoms can take years to show up, so a person can be infected and not be aware.

 

  • Prevention for Hepatitis C can be done by avoiding direct contact with blood or fluids.
  • Practice safe sexual relations by using new condoms for each encounter and using them correctly. Be aware of your partners sexual history and get tested if you think you might be infected.
  • Do not share needles, snorting straws or any illicit drug paraphernalia. Anything that comes in contact with the body you should keep personal.
  • Do not inject yourself with illicit drugs. Promising to not share needles is not always effective since withdrawal symptoms can make a person more desperate.
  • Do not share personal hygiene items like razors, nail clippers, scissors or toothbrushes. Clean items that have been used by others with soap and water.
  • Be cautious with tattooing and body piercing. Be sure that the equipment is sterilized properly and that the person performing the service is reputable.

 

A person can have Hepatitis C and infect others even when no symptoms are experienced. Be sure and get tested if you have had any of the following:

 

  1. Blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1992
  2. Long-term dialysis
  3. Used blood products in treating hemophilia before 1987
  4. Used intravenous drugs or shared drug equipment
  5. Had several sexual partners
  6. Had an abnormal liver test
  7. Were born between 1945 and 1965
  8. Birth mother had HCV
  9. Have HIV
  10. Work in the healthcare industry and have had contact with contaminated equipment

 

Treatment for Hepatitis C depends on the magnitude of any damage it has caused, the strain you have, and other health conditions. Infections that are chronic may last 6 months or more. Around 70% to 85% of individuals with HCV progress into long-term infections that may lead to serious health issues or even death.  

 

You can help spread awareness about Hepatitis by sharing this blog post with your family and friends, and by following the steps to prevent becoming infected. Your hospital car donation can help those who are suffering and being treated for this disease.